• >
  • Career
  • >
  • JPort Shukatsu Dictionary【English ver.】

JPort Shukatsu Dictionary【English ver.】

September 01, 2021 9 min read

In JPort Shukatsu Dictionary, we will introduce the definitions of job hunting “keywords” which frequently appear in the Japanese job hunting!

In JPort Shukatsu Dictionary, we will introduce the definitions of job hunting “keywords” which frequently appear in Japanese job hunting! Click HERE for the Japanese version of JPort Shukatsu Dictionary.

If you are looking for a particular vocabulary, please use “⌘ command + F” on Mac or “Ctrl + F” on Windows!

Essential Keywords for Japanese Job Hunting

Shukatsu (就活 - しゅうかつ)

An abbreviation for “shushoku katsudō”, or job-hunting in Japanese. It refers to the process of getting a job offer as a fresh graduate. It includes preparation, application, and selection rounds.

Related Article: Acing Job Hunting in Japan: Self Analysis for ES / Rirekisho and Interview

Entry Sheet (ES - エントリーシート)

One of the application documents. You answer the prompts given by the company, highlighting your personality, experiences, and skills. It is used in the first document screening before the interviews and submitted through My Page.

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: What is an Entry Sheet (ES エントリーシート)? Tips and Tricks to Pass the First Screening!

Resume / Rirekisho (履歴書 - りれきしょ)

A handwritten document submitted to the company, including your academic and work experiences, achievements, characteristics, and skills.

ID Photo (証明写真 - しょうめいしゃしん)

An official ID photo submitted to the company you apply for. Unless specified, prepare a 4cm x 3cm ID photo. You can have it taken at a photography studio or ID Photobooths. Wear suits and do your hair as you would for interviews. Save the digital copy (scan it or download it) onto your personal device. You can upload it to My Page or attach the physical copy onto rirekisho

SAMPLE ID PHOTOS

Gakuchika (ガクチカ)

It is short for the most commonly asked question, “What did you put a lot of effort into during your school years?”

Related Article: Acing Job Hunting in Japan: Self Analysis for ES / Rirekisho and Interview

Self Analysis (自己分析 - じこぶんせき)

The process of understanding and analyzing your skills, strengths, and weaknesses by reflecting on your past experiences.

Related Article: Acing Job Hunting in Japan: Self Analysis for ES / Rirekisho and Interview

Motivation for Applying(志望動機 - しぼうどうき)

A prompt on your ES or interview question, to which you answer WHY you want to work for the company you applied for. The recruiters aim to measure the applicant’s motivation and understanding of the company.

Related Article: Acing Job Hunting in Japan: Self Analysis for ES / Rirekisho and Interview

Axis of Job Hunting / Core Values (就活の軸 - しゅうかつのじく)

The values, visions, and specific qualifications you prioritize while choosing companies and industries during shukatsu.

Related Article: Acing Job Hunting in Japan: Self Analysis for ES / Rirekisho and Interview

Company Research (企業研究 - きぎょうけんきゅう)

A process of learning about the company when you are choosing companies to apply for or when preparing for ES and interviews. Use career information websites and the company website to research their business, company culture, and visions. 

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: How to Research Companies~Methods and Resources for a Better Resume and Interview~

Industry Research (業界研究 - ぎょうかいけんきゅう)

A process of learning about the various industries and their characteristics. Through this process, you can narrow down the industries you want to apply for. Understanding the competitors in a specific industry can help you in ES and interviews. 

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: How to Research Industries ~Methods and Resources for a Better Resume and Interview~ 

OBOG Visit (OBOG訪問 - OBOGほうもん)

A casual interview with the employees at the company you’re interested in. Use career information apps and university career centers to find the employees, and ask about shukatsu and the company itself. Recently, it’s conducted online on a platform like Zoom.

Related Article: What Is OBOG訪問(Houmon/Visit) and How Does It Help Job Hunting in Japan? ~Recommended Resources and Apps~

Shakaijin (社会人 - しゃかいじん)

Not a student. Someone who works for a company or runs a business.

My Page (マイページ)

Your own account for registering and applying for a specific company. For each company, you get an account. Through My Page, you register your basic information, submit an ES, and book an interview slot. 

Selection Process Opens (選考解禁 - せんこうかいきん): March 1st

This is when major Japanese firms release their recruitment information on March 1st. Simultaneously, registration websites for Japanese major firms open. 

e.g.) If you graduate in 2023, the selection process opens on March 1st, 2022.

Early Selection (早期選考 - そうきせんこう)

The earlier selection rounds for students who received excellent feedback from their internships. Typical selection rounds start in the spring when they start their final year of university but the early selection may start early in the fall of their third year.

Job-based Recruitment System (ジョブ型採用 - じょぶがたさいよう)

As opposed to typical job postings, the job-based recruitment system specifies the task you will be doing after you start working. Your position and office location are already determined.

Year-round Recruitment (通年採用 - つうねんさいよう)

The recruitment system in which a company accepts applications from fresh graduates at any time of the year. 

Actual Selection Process (本選考 - ほんせんこう)

The official selection process in the fresh graduate recruitment season. Generally, it involves document screening, exams, and several interview rounds.

Pre-entry (プレエントリー)

This means to register your basic information such as the year of graduation, study abroad experiences, ID Photo, skills, to a company’s My Page. Once you complete Pre-entry, you show the company you are applying for the Actual Selection Process and receive an email and notification from the company that tells you the selection schedule and information session schedule.

Entry for Actual Selection Process  (本選考エントリー - ほんせんこうえんとりー)

To submit your Web Aptitude Test scores and ES (“Gakuchika”, Motivation for Applying, Self Promotion), not just the basic information. 

MyNavi (マイナビ)

A career information website. It has more than 20,000 companies registered. It offers information about each company, schedule for job hunting, and tools for Self Analysis. 

Related Article: How to Search for Jobs in Japan: Websites and Apps for Job Hunting 

Rikunabi (リクナビ)

Similar to MyNavi, it is another well-used and highly reviewed career information website. It has more than 10,000 companies registered

Related Article: How to Search for Jobs in Japan: Websites and Apps for Job Hunting 

Gaishi Shukatsu.com (外資就活ドットコム - がいししゅうかつどっとこむ)

A job-hunting platform. It has informational articles on job hunting strategies and analysis, as well as the schedule for company information sessions. It also has a forum where you can exchange job hunting information with other students.

Related Article: How to Search for Jobs in Japan: Websites and Apps for Job Hunting 

Information Session (説明会 - せつめいかい)

A company event for students who are job hunting. They explain their vision, business model and projects, and recruitment schedule.

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: Why You Should Attend Company Information Session (説明会 - せつめいかい) and Job Fair (合同説明会 - ごうどうせつめいかい)

Job Fair (合同説明会 - ごうどうせつめいかい)

When career information websites such as MyNavi and Rikunabi invite multiple companies to give information sessions in a large venue. It could have a theme like a specific industry, or not. You can attend several information sessions by different companies on the same day.

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: Why You Should Attend Company Information Session (説明会 - せつめいかい) and Job Fair (合同説明会 - ごうどうせつめいかい)

Q&A Session (質疑応答 - しつぎおうとう)

The allocated time at the end of a company information session when you can directly ask the recruiters questions.

Related Article: How to Prepare for Job Interviews in Japan: Sample Questions and Pre-Interview Checklist 

Career Forum (キャリアフォーラム)

A job fair targeting Japanese and English bilinguals, held by Career Forum Net (CFN). Participating companies hold booths in the venue. Students can walk into any booth freely and have an interview with the recruiter on the spot. In 2021, they will be held online. 

Related Article: Boston Career Forum, a Global Job Fair for Bilingual Jobs in Japan

Boston Career Forum (ボストンキャリアフォーラム)

The biggest job hunting event for Japanese and English bilinguals. Around 200 companies attend and seek to hire students with study abroad experiences or are bilinguals. 

Related Articles: Boston Career Forum, a Global Job Fair for Bilingual Jobs in Japan

Short-term Internship (短期インターンシップ - たんきいんたーんしっぷ)

An internship held over 1 day to 1 week. This may include Group Work with other candidates and company information sessions, and talk sessions with employees.

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: Two Types of Internships in Japan: Long-term vs. Short-term Internship

Long-term Internship (長期インターンシップ - ちょうきいんたーんしっぷ)

An internship held for longer than 3 months. You will participate in actual business projects, work among employees, and learn the basics of business. This may lead directly to a job offer. 

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: Two Types of Internships in Japan: Long-term vs. Short-term Internship

Wantedly (ウォンテッドリー)

A career platform that has many Long-Term Internship job postings from ventures, mega ventures, and startups. You can filter the search results by various features and find an internship that suits you.

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: Two Types of Internships in Japan: Long-term vs. Short-term Internship

Web Aptitude Test (webテスト/適性検査 - てきせいけんさ)

A test conducted in the earlier rounds of the recruitment process. It will test your basic math, Japanese, and English levels. Candidates will take it online from their homes or on a computer at a designated test center. 

SPI

Stands for ‘Synthetic Personality Inventory’. It assesses your personality and tests basic calculation and language skills. 

Test subjects include Language (Japanese), Non-Language (Math), and Personality Assessment.

TG-web

A Web Aptitude Test taken online. The format is similar to others but it is said to be more difficult.

Tamatebako (玉手箱 - たまてばこ)・C-GAB

A Web Aptitude Test taken at home from your own computer. It is used frequently for summer internship applications. The test subjects are Language, Non-Language, and Personality Assessment, same as SPI.

GAB

Similar to SPI and Tamatebako in the format of the questions, but it is taken on paper (multiple-choice mark sheet).

Related Article: What are SPI and Web Aptitude Test (web適性検査)? Prepare for a Key Step and Ace Job Hunting in Japan

Onsha (御社 - おんしゃ)・Kisha (貴社 - きしゃ)

A word that formally addresses the company in keigo. When speaking, use Onsha. When writing ES or Rirekisho, use Kisha.

Interview (面接 - めんせつ)

The selection stage where interviewers from the company and the candidate talk, and the interviewers evaluate the candidate’s personality and skills.

Related Article: How to Prepare for Job Interviews in Japan: Sample Questions and Pre-Interview Checklist 

Interview with Executives (役員面接 - やくいんめんせつ)

The interview where the executives and the CEO interview the candidate. It is usually the final round of the interview, not the first or second.

Talk session (面談 - めんだん)

A casual talk session with the recruiters or employees. Compared to interviews (Mensetsu / 面接), there is no pass or fail in this talk session. However, they may evaluate you as a candidate, so prepare thoroughly as if it is a real interview.

Reverse Interviewing (逆質問 - ぎゃくしつもん)

Set of questions to ask the interviewer at the end of an interview, when they ask you “do you have any questions for us?” Ask relevant questions that reflect the findings from Company and Industry Research so that you can show your motivation and commitment to the company.

Related Article: How to Prepare for Job Interviews in Japan: Sample Questions and Pre-Interview Checklist 

Mock Interview (模擬面接 - もぎめんせつ)

To practice interviews for a job as if it is a real one. Usually, you follow the whole process, including entering the room, answering the interviewer’s questions, reverse interviewing, and exiting the room.

Related Article: How to Prepare for Job Interviews in Japan: Sample Questions and Pre-Interview Checklist 

Case Interview (ケース面接 - けーすめんせつ)

The interview format where candidates come up with a logical business solution during an allocated time. You get evaluated for problem-solving skills. It is a common form of an interview in the consulting industry. 

Related Article: Job Hunting in Japan: What are Case Interview (ケース面接) and Fermi Estimation (フェルミ推定 - ふぇるみすいてい)? How to Prepare for Interviews with Consulting Firms, Investment Banks, and Trading Companies

Group Interview (グループ面接 - ぐるーぷめんせつ)

An interview in which multiple candidates participate at the same time. All of them answer the same questions (Self Promotion, “Gakuchika”). Candidates may be told to ask questions to each other.

Group Discussion (GD - グループディスカッション)

A selection round where a group of candidates discuss a given topic and come up with a business solution. In some companies, the leader of the group may have to present the findings. Candidates get evaluated for their participation, comments, and attitude during the discussion.

Related Article: What is Group Discussion, a Unique Job Interview in Japan? How to Prepare and Practice

Pre-Job Offer / Unofficial Job Offer (内々定 or 内内定 - ないないてい)

A verbal agreement, email notification, or phone call notifying you that you got through all of the selection processes and got a job offer. 

Job Offer Notice (内定通知 - ないていつうち)

The job offer notification given through a call, email, or My Page alert.

Job Offer (内定 - ないてい)

An official job offer with a contract.

Acceptance of Offer of Employment (入社受諾 - にゅうしゃしょうだく)

The official document that you sign, indicating you accept the company’s offer and are going to join the company.

Prayer Email (お祈りメール - おいのりめーる)

A rejection email or notification from a company.

Foreign-capital Corporations / International companies (外資系 - がいしけい)

Companies that have a certain number of investors abroad. Or, companies that have headquarters abroad but have a branch in Japan and do business here.  

Japanese Corporations (日系 - にっけい)

Companies that were founded in Japan or have headquarters in Japan.

Sougoushoku (総合職 - そうごうしょく)

A job position that deals with the central tasks in a company. There is no specific task or role assigned when they start out, and they experience various tasks in various departments. 

Related Article: Types of Jobs in Japan for New Graduates - What are Sougoushoku (総合職), Ippanshoku(一般職), and R&D?

Benefits (福利厚生 - ふくりこうせい)

Non-wage compensations that a company gives to their employees.

e.g.) Housing allowance, parental leave, MBA support

Major Firms (大手企業 - おおてきぎょう)

Leading corporations in a specific industry that are well-known or have a large share of the product group.

Mid and Small-sized Companies (中小企業 - ちゅうしょうきぎょう)

Companies with a total investment lower than 300 million yen and the number of employees under 300.

Group Companies (グループ企業 - ぐるーぷきぎょう)

The parent company and all its subsidiaries.

Subsidiaries (子会社 - こがいしゃ)

Companies in which the parent company owns 50% or more of their stocks. In other words, the parent company controls the decision-making process regarding the management.

Average Annual Income (平均年収 - へいきんねんしゅう) 

The average income of all the employees at the company. 

JPort Student Support Team
We create Borderless Japan

Table of contents

Not a JPort user yet? Start today for free.

On JPort Journal,

Ask Senpais about 就活 on the forum

Watch & Read Contents made by Senpais & JPort

Participate on JPort’s events

On JPort Match,

Connect with HR of companies in Japan on JPort Match

Related Contents